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Android SDK for wearables coming in two weeks’ time

Posted by wicked March - 10 - 2014 - Monday Comments Off

Google has sold “millions” of Chromecasts, according to Android and Chrome chief Sundar Pichai. In addition to the sensational news of Chromecast sales, Pichai also noted at SXSW there would be an Android SDK for wearables coming soon. It fits a previously leaked timeframe, but little else was said for Google’s version of wearable software.

Though Pichai didn’t note exactly what the SDK would entail, he did say it wasn’t solely for smartwatches. According to him, Google’s idea is that the SDK will be built by them, saying it would be Gogole’s “vision for developers of how we see this market working”. but Developers and OEMs will have the option to pick and choose what to use. That makes it a more cross-platform option for wearables in general, and frees interested OEMs up to hardware development.

Pichai did give a solid timeline for a wearable SDK from Google, which is rare. Though he didn’t give specifics as to what the SDK would include, he did say it would arrive n two weeks’ time. While some expected a whole new operating system, it sounds as though there will be a simple SDK, at least for now. Many believe the smartwatch will be based on Google Now, so perhaps Developers will now have access to a Google Now SDK — something many have pined for since the launch of the Search skin.

Chromecast sales are interesting, but the little plug-in heading to more countries is much more important. The Android SDK for wearables is a potentially big deal for tiny devices, and could do for smartwatches and other wearables what Android did for smartphones. We’ll be looking forward to an announcement from Google later this month.

Source: The Next Web

Chromecast to expand to new markets within the month

Posted by wicked March - 10 - 2014 - Monday Comments Off

Sundar_Pichai_7885

At Sundar Pichai’s keynote at the SXSW (South by Southwest) conference, he mentioned that Chromecast would be hitting “many more countries” in the coming weeks.

These countries include the UK and Australia, which had been rumored since last month. Because the device’s SDK was released in February, you can expect the capabilities of the dongle to expand in the next few months as well.

He didn’t talk about sales figures, but mentioned that the numbers are in the millions, and is continuing to grow rapidly.

During the keynote Pichai also mentioned that an Android SDK for wearables would be coming in the next two weeks as well.

Source: The Next Web

Come comment on this article: Chromecast to expand to new markets within the month

Chromecast now available from Amazon for $30

Posted by wicked February - 18 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

Chromecast_481

If you’ve been thinking about grabbing a Chromecast in the past few days, now may be the time to do it. The device is currently available on Amazon for $30. There doesn’t appear to be any side-deals on this one, like there have been in the past, which include Google Play Credit, rebates, etc.

With Chromecast’s SDK now available to the public, the device is as valuable as it’ll ever be, until of course the next model comes out. If you’re down to dongle, head on over to Amazon and grab one.

Source: Amazon

Come comment on this article: Chromecast now available from Amazon for $30

LG releases SDK for their QSlide technology

Posted by wicked January - 28 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

LG has made the SDK for their QSlide technology available to interested Developers. QSlide is what gives LG apps the ability to overlay one another, while others continue to run visibly in the background. The utility will be limited to LG devices, but this move encourages increased Development for their platform.


Found on their G2, the functionality of QSlide is great for multitasking. Users simply open an app, which then lays over the existing app in a smaller window. When you need to fire off a quick email or set a reminder, but don’t really want to stop watching that YouTube video, it’s a dream.

Launching the SDK will allow Developers to make their apps act a bit more like LG’s, which can be great for fans of the LG OS environment. By including the SDK, Developers will have the choice of floating and fullscreen modes, as well as customizing the window appearance — all the way down to transparency levels. A quick launch icon can also be added to the LG QSlide tray in the notification menu.

Those who are interested can pick up the SDK via LG, which also comes with some reference reading. The SDK documents provide a how-to of sorts for getting an app up and running with QSlide, showing that LG is very serious about the program. Likely a big part of LG’s future, we expect to see QSlide on both the G 2 Pro and G3 in the near future.
VIA: Android Central

OUYA developer consoles begin shipping December 28th

Posted by wicked December - 1 - 2012 - Saturday Comments Off

It appears as though the highly anticipated and long-awaited OUYA consoles have officially been given a firm ship date of December 28th today, in addition to the news that the console’s SDK, dubbed “ODK”, would be available later that very same day. This announcement means Kickstarter backers can expect to receive the device “within a couple days” of the 28th, effectively kicking off their new year with a bang.

Production units are still expected to ship some time in March of next year, though the company has yet to announce an official release date. On the software side of things, users can expect to set up their units, including account activations by Christmas day. For the full run-down, be sure to hit the source link below.

Source: OUYA



Google Modifies SDK Terms In Attempt To Curb Fragmentation

Posted by wicked November - 17 - 2012 - Saturday Comments Off

Android Fragmentation

Google has made a change to the terms and conditions of the Android SDK (software development kit) to explicitly prohibit developers from taking any action that may lead to the fragmentation of Android. This is the first change to the terms since April, 2009.

Section 3.4 of the SDK terms states: You agree that you will not take any actions that may cause or result in the fragmentation of Android, including but not limited to distributing, participating in the creation of, or promoting in any way a software development kit derived from the SDK.

With such a wide variety of Android devices of different specs and sizes, Google and the different Android manufacturers have had a hard time keeping devices updated with the latest OS. The multiple versions of Android in use by consumers makes developing for Android a much more complex and pricey endeavor. This change marks the first overt step Google has taken to combat this issue.

Source: Google
Via: CNET



Kindle Fire HD 7 root method

Posted by wicked September - 18 - 2012 - Tuesday Comments Off

As consumers start to get their hands on a new Amazon Kindle Fire HD 7 device, some will certainly want to stretch the capabilities of their new tablet. They will be met with frustration if they decide to pursue a new bootloader as it appears Amazon has locked down the devices extra tight. XDA forum member kinfauns did some digging only to discover Amazon has employed some high security device techniques similar to Barnes & Noble’s Nook Tablet devices. Unlike a Nook, the Kindle Fire HD 7 does not have an SD card slot that can be used as an alternate boot device. Developers are exploring workarounds for this situation.

There is good news though on the root front. RootzWiki contributor jcase(OP) has determined Amazon failed to secure a known method for gaining root access on Ice Cream Sandwich devices. Using the Android SDK, it is only a matter of minutes to root the device. Just hit the source link for the instructions if you want to give it a try. Just remember though, you are responsible for what happens to your device if you root it and something goes wrong.

source: RootzWiki



Google updates Jelly Bean SDK – now available for the public

Posted by wicked July - 19 - 2012 - Thursday Comments Off

When Google announced Android 4.1 Jelly Bean last month at Google IO it was all cheers. They made the early SDK available for developers in a preview state, but today have unleashed it into the wild for all. This is good news for those developers looking to get into Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and start pumping out awesome applications.

As usual the update is available for developers in their SDK manager, or you can also download it direct today from the link below. Google announced this late last night over on Google+, and confirmed the new Jelly Bean SDK is an updated and complete version, and differs from the preview build released during IO. Here’s what they had to say:

We are pleased to announce that the full SDK for Android 4.1 is now available to developers and can be downloaded through your SDK Manager. You can now develop and publish applications against API level 16 using new Jelly Bean APIs. We are also releasing SDK Tools revision 20.0.1 and NDK revision 8b containing bug fixes only.

Google mentions this will help developers get their apps ready for Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, as well as their new Nexus 7 — which was basically expected. They’ve already released Android 4.1.1 to AOSP, so developers have already been hard at work building ROM’s, but now app developers can dive in too. Google also appears to be pushing developers to build their apps to better support tablets. Which is a good move considering that is one area that Android tablets could still use some help.

More details and download information can be found at the Android Developers Blog.



SDK for Android 4.1 is now available

Posted by wicked July - 19 - 2012 - Thursday Comments Off

Google released the Android 4.1 SDK today and it is now available for download. Included with the SDK are revised versions of SDK Tools (20.1.1) and NDK revision 8b. The new tools will let developers publish code up to API level 16 using Jelly Bean APIs. As usual, the SDK is available for Windows, Mac and Linux platforms.  The SDK and related tools can be installed via an existing installation of the SDK or one can head over to the Android Developers’ web site.

Nick Butcher, an Android engineer who announced the release on the Android Developers blog, also provided some hints and recommendations to improve the level of polish and professional presentation for new Jelly Bean apps. The advice is provided as a way to help developers get a jump start on app development that goes beyond just working, especially since this will likely be developers’ first exposure to Jelly Bean. The tips and tricks are geared toward the Google Nexus 7, but should translate to other devices over time.

Follow the source link to read up on Butcher’s suggestions and to access the SDK on the developers’ web site.

source: Android Developers Blog



Samsung Galaxy S II Receives Jelly Bean SDK Port

Posted by wicked July - 10 - 2012 - Tuesday Comments Off

Thanks to LastStandingDroid over at the XDA forums, the Samsung Galaxy S II (I9100) has received an Android 4.1 Jelly Bean SDK port. With any SDK port, the build is fairly rough and one should expect many things to either not work, or not work correctly. Although there is a short list of things that do work:

  • Device boot
  • LED-flash
  • SD card (internal-only)
  • MTP (can’t copy files)
  • ADB
  • Vibration
  • SuperUser
  • SM
  • Network Data
  • Logcat
While it’s great that certain aspects of it do work, there is quite a laundry list of things that don’t work such as audio (can’t use it as a phone), WiFi, Bluetooth, camera, GPS, etc. An SDK ported ROM is never meant to be used as a daily driver, it serves more or less as a way for a user to preview the new firmware. Of course, your phone needs to be rooted and have a custom recovery installed in order to flash this. Head over to the source link for more information.

source: XDA