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Meet the Devs – Minisaur

Posted by wicked January - 28 - 2015 - Wednesday Comments Off

Developer Interview - Minisaur
Welcome back to our Meet the Devs segment! In this piece we take a little time to get to know the people who really make Android what it is today and that is the app developers. In this week’s developer interview, we are talking to Matthew Mario Negri of Minisaur.

Name: Mario Negri

Developer Name: Minisaur

Country: Italy

Website: Official Facebook page

Social Media Profile/Page: Google+

How many people on your team? 3

bruce wheels icon Developer Interview - Minisaur

Apps

Bruce Wheels

About your company?

Minisaur is a small group of 3 really good friends. We are all from Milan (Italy) and have the same great passion for videogames. The 2 designers of the team both studied Design & Engineering at the Polytechnic University of Milan, where they got to know each other and discovered their common interest. The last year of their studies they decided to create their first game and asked me to be the key part of the team. :) Before working with Gianni and Riccardo I was a freelance software developer for many big italian and european companies and studios. Minisaur was my chance to finally focus on something I really love.

What level of experience do you have with coding and development?

I’ve worked for 6 years as a web developer and recently started to develop apps for Android. To develop Bruce Wheels and Java Android apps I use Eclipse. I have some experience with visual studio to develop .net applications, while for web I’ve been mainly using notepad++, ultraedit and sublime text.

What languages do you know? How and where did you learn them?

The first language I learned was Amiga Basic, thanks to my father’s lessons when I was only 12 years old :) To develop Bruce Wheels I used Java, which I first learned back in Highschool. I’m extremely well versed with python, asp 3.0, php and c# and familiar with visual basic 6 and c ansi. The book I recently really loved to read is “Pragmatic Programmer”, which really teached me the correct way to act and think as a programmer.

What level of experience do you have with design?

0, zero. All the design is done by my brother Riccardo and my friend Gianni :) They are awesome! They do their job using mainly Adobe Illustrator and Spine, a great program for 2d animations which we chose to support since its Kickstarter.

bruce wheels minisaur developer interview

What apps have you made?

Bruce Wheels is our first big app. We put all our passion to develop and design it the way we wanted it to be. We strongly believe in this project, which took us way too much time :) We worked on it for 2 years in our little spare time between work, university and other annoying IRL stuff.

How do you monetize your apps?

For Bruce Wheels we chose a freemium model. The game is free to download, while the complete version without ads is unlocked with an in-app purchase. We want people to try our game before purchasing it and we thought that this was the best way to do it as a new indie company.

Do you consider yourself successful?

I created something I love, together with 2 of my best friends. Within the span of 2 years, we all acquired in depth technical knowledge in building and designing a great Android game. Yes we consider ourselves successful. :)

How difficult is it to make money as a developer?

As an indie developer it is really difficult. With the Android market beeing flooded with all kinds of trash apps coming out every second, games developed with passion and love are simply not noticed without marketing and advertisement.
bruce wheels minisaur developer interview

What can Android do to improve?

Android is used on so many devices, it is really difficult to get a game running well on all of them. There could also be a spotlight on a choice of new indie releases in their main page on the Google Play Store.

Why did you choose Android? Do you develop for other platforms? What are the differences between them?

We picked Android mainly for one reason: it was the type of device we all had when we started. We have never been the biggest Apple fans and love Android becouse it is open source and costumizable. I’ve never tried to develop anything for iOS or Windows Phone yet, but I may do an iOS version of Bruce Wheels soon™.

What do you think of the Android design guidelines?

Early on, there weren’t any guidelines and it was really hard to design a consistent user experience without the help of good UI designers. Now they are really well designed and simple but there’s not that much yet that could be applied to games.
bruce wheels minisaur developer interview

What are your favorite apps?

My favourite games for Android are Cannabalt, Rayman Jungle Run and Doodle Jump. I really love to use Whatsapp, Dropbox, Sketchbook Mobile, Waze, Tasker and Wunderlist on a daily basis.

What has been your experience been like working with Google?

Google is really fast to solve problems and to give feedback to opened tickets. The play console once had a problem with my app and they were really kind to immediately contact me and get it fixed.

What tips do you have for aspiring developers?

Be passionate about what you do. Passion drives creativity. It is passion that keeps you working on something you love for hours on end. It’s what eats away at your nights and weekends, completely destroying your social life.


Developer interview wrap up

We want to thank Mario for chatting with us in this week’s developer interview! If you’re a developer and this looks like something you’d like to do, check out our Meet the Devs form! We look forward to hearing from you!

appfigures_app_by_appstore

Given the differing business models being employed by Google and Apple in getting their mobile operating systems into the hands of consumers, it should be no surprise that despite a jump start by Apple, Google is ahead in many measures. Even in areas where Apple has a lead, Google is steadily marching toward dominance. An example of this occurred in 2014 according to app metrics tracking firm AppFigures whose latest numbers show Google’s Play Store has surpassed Apple’s store in terms of both number of apps and developers.

According to AppFigures, the Google Play Store now boasts 1.43 million apps compared to 1.21 million available in Apple’s App Store. There are some who may counter that Apple is much more strict about what gets into their store, which keeps the numbers down. Nevertheless, there will be many Android fans who will point to this change in app figures as a major milestone for Google’s business.

Meanwhile, the number of developers who are working on apps for each store continued to grow faster for the Play Store than it did for the App Store. In terms of actual numbers, Google has been in the lead for a few years now and has now reached 388,000 developers compared to Apple’s 282,000 developers.

As a whole, app development continues to grow at a very strong clip. All three major app stores – Google’s Play Store, Apple’s App Store and Amazon’s Appstore – all saw at least 50% growth during 2014. This kind of expansion should continue during 2015 as manufacturers work to expand their ecosystems to a whole variety of new platforms, especially wearables, that will push developers to consider new ways to support interaction with apps.

appfigures_developers_by_appstore

source: 9to5Google

Come comment on this article: Google’s Play Store eclipses Apple’s App Store in number of apps and developers for first time

Meet the Devs – Adepture

Posted by wicked December - 30 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

Daily Bible Verse Android developer interview
Welcome back to our Meet the Devs segment! In this piece we take a little time to get to know the people who really make Android what it is today and that is the app developers. In this week’s developer interview, we are talking to John Wycoff of Adepture.

Name: John Wycoff

Developer Name: Adepture

Country: United States

Website: Official website

Social Media Profile/Page: N/A

How many people on your team? 1

daily bible verse developer interview

Apps

Daily Bible Verse

About your company?

Company? No company here. Just a developer making apps in his spare time.

What level of experience do you have with coding and development?

I have been coding now for 19 years which is a little more than half my life. I started back in 1996 with a friend’s broken IBM computer that I had to learn how to fix before I could even get started. Once up and running I quickly found my way to geocities and made a free website. At the time, knew so little about computers that I actually wrote down (on paper) the long html snippet given to me to add a hit counter to my website. Felt pretty silly when I figured out copy/paste.

Html turned into JavaScript, then moved my way into Visual Basic and ASP. By the age 20, I was working at SaaS based company as a developer where I rode out the dot com bust. I left the SaaS company and started working for myself, designing websites, coding various projects and working with small businesses with their marketing.

Back in 2010, I was introduced to a pet insurance company needing some help moving a development project along. It was supposed to only be a three month stint but turned into permenant employment where I am currently the Director of IT and Marketing.

Catfish app developer interview

What languages do you know? How and where did you learn them?

Lots of them, but to keep to the basics: C#, T-SQL, VB, Java, JavaScript, HTML, CSS and so on.

What level of experience do you have with design?

Design is huge! Far too often, websites, mobile apps and desktop applications put design to the bottom of the priority list or improperly implement it. I have always put design first. It doesn’t matter what your app does or what great problems it solves if the design is not inviting or is so complicated the average user can easily figure out how to operate it.

What apps have you made?

I have one “successful” app and that is The Daily Bible Verse. Before this app, I made two others, ElectroCosts (measures electric costs of running an appliance) and Catfish Tactics and Secret Baits. ElectroCosts was my Hello World project into the Android development world. Catfish Tactics was another test app to get some more real world experience in app development.

After the initial two apps, I wanted to make one that had some value and would get daily real world use. That is when I created the Daily Bible Verse.

How do you monetize your apps?

Right now it is 100% mobile ads. In-app purchasing looks pretty interesting but I will need to make another app for that.

Do you consider yourself successful?

Yes. I am not making an app development firm here. I wanted to make an app that would have a large user base and I did. The icing on the cake was that the Daily Bible Verse’s sole purpose was intended to create a daily connection between its users and God. Considering it does that well in excess of 40,000 times a day, yeah, I would say I was successful.

Daily Bible Verse Android developer interview

How difficult is it to make money as a developer?

It is not hard at all to make money has a developer. The easiest way by far is simply working as one either as an employee or as a consultant. Making money as an app “developer” is the easy part. The hard part is inventing an app that has enough value to get people to actually download/purchase and use it.

What can Android do to improve?

Not sure that I have enough experience with Android to where my opinion would hold much weight but they could certainly streamline the development process better and improve their “guidelines”.

Why did you choose Android? Do you develop for other platforms? What are the differences between them?

Java. I already knew JavaScript and C# with some exposure to Java. Not only that but I was (and still am) a huge fan of android. There was no contest.

What are your thoughts on iOS and Windows 8?

Meh. iOS is definitely in the future for me. It obviously has a lot of value with these apple toting hipsters running around. Windows 8, not so much. I would have to see a lot more progress in their share of the market before it becomes a possibility for me.

What do you think of the Android design guidelines?

For the most part, the Android design guidelines are great and are a very useful tool. However, in a lot of cases, they come up short or completely skip over important features.

electrocost developer interview

What are your favorite apps?

Right now my favorite apps are mostly centered around managing my apps and websites such as AdSense and Analytics. Also at the top of my list right now are Hangouts, BrainWars, and Google Inbox.

What has been your experience been like working with Google?

Love/Hate. As I mentioned before I am a huge Android (and Google) fan but as I also mentioned the development process could be a little cleaner and more streamlined.

What does the future of development look like?

How far into the future are we looking? The development space is going to get more crowded with developers, languages, tools and methodologies. The devices that are created in varying sizes and resolution to more complicated it is going to get.

What tips do you have for aspiring developers?

Don’t get caught up in new tools or plug-ins unless you have a specific need for them. Keep things simple and functional above all else. Test your apps for usability. A user should be able to mindlessly navigate through your app with seamlessly flowing actions.

Keep It Simple (for the) Stupid


Developer interview wrap up

We want to thank John for chatting with us in this week’s developer interview! If you’re a developer and this looks like something you’d like to do, check out our Meet the Devs form! We look forward to hearing from you!

10 best indie Android apps and Android games of 2014

Posted by wicked December - 25 - 2014 - Thursday Comments Off

Best indie android apps and games 2014
As many of our regular readers know, we here at Android Authority do an indie app of the day to show off some of the good stuff that smaller developer studios (and individuals) are doing. Many of them are very good attempts but seem to be missing a little something to make them truly great but every now and then something truly special comes across the desk. In this roundup, we’ll take a look at ten of those truly special indie Android apps and games from 2014.


BitLit best Indie Android appsBitLit

[Price: Free with in app purchases]
BitLit the app still has some work that needs to be done but the premise is one of the most promising of any indie app I reviewed this year. BitLit lets you scan your bookshelf (read: physical books) and tries to find you free versions of those books in ebook format or at least tries to find them for you super cheap so you can digitize your book collection. They have a long, steep road ahead of them but the idea is just fantastic and the app is free to try if you’re interested.
Get it on Google Play
BitLit review best indie Android apps


buff knight best indie android apps and android gamesBuff Knight

[Price: Free / $0.99]
Buff Knight is a fun, albeit short game that mixes the infinite runner-style game play with a few RPG elements. There are two modes of game play and as you play, you unlock new items, collect gold, tap fairies, and kill bad guys. Both the free and paid version contains the core game with the paid version removing advertisements. There is also Google Play Games achievements for those who want that. It’s not a very long game but it was developed by just one guy so it’s forgivable. We hope to see a Buff Knight 2 someday.
Get it on Google Play
buff knight best indie android apps and android games


brilliant quotes best indie android appsBrilliant Quotes and Quotations

[Price: Free with in app purchases]
It’s hard to believe that we’re talking about a quotes app in 2014 but alas Brilliant Quotes and Quotations did well enough to get a mention here. The app is solidly designed with a calm brown and gray layout and contains 3600 quotes from over 260 visionaries. That’s roughly one quote a day for just under 10 years. It’s free with in app purchases if you’re interested and sometimes we could all use a word of wisdom.
Get it on Google Play
brilliant quotes best indie android apps


complete ear trainer best indie android apps and gamesComplete Ear Trainer

[Price: Free with in app purchases]
Complete Ear Trainer is a niche application but one that really stood out in terms of its solid design standard and unique blend of app and game. It is a reference app that teaches people how to tune and identify music notes by ear. It utilizes 150 drills over four levels and 28 chapters. However, it also has things like Google Play Games achievements and other backend elements that make it feel more like a game than a learning app. We really liked that hybrid combo and it brings a really special experience to those who use this app.
Get it on Google Play
complete ear trainer best indie android apps and games


godville best indie android apps and gamesGodville

[Price: Free with in app purchases]
Godville is a unique text-based game where you play the roll of God and you watch over a warrior. The warrior “tweets” his thoughts and adventures and you read them and react. You can perform miracles, punishments, and try to control the character. He may or may not listen and you may punish or reward him accordingly. There is no game play whatsoever so it may bore some people but it’s still very interesting and surprisingly fun considering that you don’t actually have to do anything.
Get it on Google Play
godville best indie android apps and games


oops applock best indie android apps and android gamesOops! AppLock

[Price: Free with in app purchases]
Oops! AppLock is a very unique security application. What it does is lock selected applications behind a fake splash screen and the only way to unlock it is to enter the code. The code can be set by the user and uses the volume keys. An example of a code would be volume up, volume up, volume down, volume down. Users can create their own custom images that pop up or leave them as they are to make unsuspecting nosy people think the app froze or crashed. It’s a little rough around the edges but effective.
Get it on Google Play
oops applock best indie android apps and android games


Payback 2 best indie android apps and android gamesPayback 2

[Price: Free with in app purchases]
Payback 2 is a perfect example of what happens when you base your game around the idea of having constant chaos. Players can play online or solo in various game modes such as races and all out deathmatches. Each match takes place in an open world that players can actively explore although it’s not always recommended because usually other players are trying to kill you. There is a variety of weapons and vehicles as well as weekly, daily, and hourly challenges to try to keep things fresh.
Get it on Google Play
Payback 2 best indie android apps and android games


potential beta best indie android apps and android gamesPotential beta

[Price: Free]
Potential Beta is an Android app that allows you to sync the Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and battery status across all of your devices. You can also toggle Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on those other devices if you so choose which is a nice touch. This is definitely a fun management app if you have multiple devices, has a decent design, and it’s also free. Recent updates also added Android Wear support, a Chrome extension, and more.
Get it on Google Play
potential beta best indie android apps and android games


roughanimator best indie android apps and gamesRoughAnimator

[Price: $1.99]
RoughAnimator has been a favorite of mine since I reviewed it. It’s a drawing app that lets you draw the various frames in an animation then put them together to create a short animated video. It works best on tablets and large phones (and with a stylus). It has a host of basic animation features and in many cases, the biggest limitation is only your imagination. It’s not a professional grade animation app but it definitely comes closer than pretty much everything else in the Play Store right now.
Get it on Google Play


stuffmerge best indie android apps and gamesStuffMerge Clipboard Composer

[Price: Free]
Last up this year is StuffMerge Clipboard Composer. This new and unique take on the copy/paste mechanism allows you to compose notes and lists using the stuff that you copy around your device. Then you can choose to send or share that note or list to others via the usual sources. It’s definitely a niche app but the frequent copy/paster can find a lot of uses for an app like this. It’s also totally free so it doesn’t hurt to check it out.
Get it on Google Play
stuffmerge best indie android apps and games


Wrap up

If we missed any lesser known, indie Android apps or Android games, let us know in the comments!

Deal: $49 Android Game Developer Bundle, $700+ Worth of Goodies

Posted by Kellex December - 23 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

Becoming the next great Android game developer takes more than just luck. If you want to make the next great mobile game, you need to have the skills to make it. The problem is, there aren’t many courses or guides or “BEGIN HERE” sets of instructions to get you going – you have to go out, find it all on your own, and hope you made the right decisions on courses. Thankfully, the current Android Game Developer Bundle we have on-sale in the DL Deals shop is here to help take the pain (and price) out of the entire process.

For just $49 (with a value well over $700), you can get into Android game development in a hurry. From an Android Lollipop Dev Course (118 lectures) to 2D Game Developing with Unity3D (20 lectures) to an All-Level Android App Development Course (32 lectures) to earning income with your games (49 lectures), you have a course put together to help anyone kickstart their development carrier.

Overall, you have seven courses in the bundle, though you only have three days left to get them all at $49.

Deal Link

Deal: $49 Android Game Developer Bundle, $700+ Worth of Goodies is a post from: Droid Life

Meet the Devs – Alongways

Posted by wicked December - 16 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

Peter and Leslie developer interview
Welcome back to our Meet the Devs segment! In this piece we take a little time to get to know the people who really make Android what it is today and that is the app developers. In this week’s developer interview, we are talking to Peter Mojeiko of Alongways.

Name: Peter Mojeiko

Developer Name: Alongways

Country: United States

Website: Official website

Social Media Profile/Page: N/A

How many people on your team? 2

alongways developer interview

Apps

Silence Shout

About your company?

I’m a geographer, and my wife is an advisor at a college. The company is just us, and we work on nights and weekends after our 2-year-old daughter goes to sleep.

I picked up some programming books about a year ago to stay current with the world of geospatial science. Once I realized what could be done, and what’s already being done, between the marriage of technology and maps, I wanted to get involved. So I learned everything I could about making apps, and I asked my wife, who is really good in Photoshop, to help with some graphics, and together we put together Alongways because it’s a practical tool that doesn’t exist yet, and it really should.

Alongways screenshot developer interview

What level of experience do you have with coding and development?

It’s not my day job. Well, not entirely. I kind of started learning to code on a whim, and I discovered that I had a sort of passion for doing it. It made me rethink some career choices, which was good because I was laid off from my geography job last summer, and now I’m more in the IT field.

I had a lot of fun learning about the whole development process while making Alongways. Parts that I thought would be difficult, like figuring out some algorithm to do a place search, were actually really enjoyable. I mean, still difficult, but I liked the challenge. And then parts that I thought would be easier, like going through testing, turned out to be huge burdens. Worth it, but still burdens.

What languages do you know? How and where did you learn them?

I started with Python. I think it’s a great introduction to functional programming. Once I started, I couldn’t stop, I’d stay up late just programming anything I could think of. I felt comfortable with it in a couple of months. I read two books, did some online tutorials, but the biggest thing was just using it, constantly. I moved into JavaScript and HTML when I started making Alongways, and I’ve picked up the basics of a few other languages since then.

What level of experience do you have with design?

That’s mostly my wife’s area. She has an eye for it. I’ll take her two or three different mock-ups of a layout or graphic, and she’ll say, “Umm. I’ll do it.” I’m not the designer, but I’m getting better (I think).

Alongways screenshot developer interview

What apps have you made?

Alongways, but I’ve got a lot more in the pipe. It’s crazy that I’ve got friends now, who will come to me with their app ideas, and it’s actually kind of sad that I can’t help them more, but I have so many more ideas that I want to get out there, I just don’t know where I’d come up with the time.

How do you monetize your apps?

Alongways is .99 cents. It took a long time, and a lot of discussion, with my wife and other people, to decide to go the paid app route. It looks like it’s just slapped on there, but there’s actually a lot of thought behind it. You have to consider your own sunk costs, web hosting, API license fees, developer fees, all this stuff. I researched ads in apps, and I don’t think Alongways would benefit from them, and I thought about integrating some referral programs for places like hotels, because you can search for hotels, but I didn’t want it to be just, you know, like a hotel search engine. Those are a dime a dozen! So, to keep the real intent of it, it’s .99 cents. I’m not sure how I’ll monetize my next one, I think it’s totally a case-by-case basis.

Do you consider yourself successful?

Yes! I have an awesome wife who helps me build apps, a two-year-old daughter, and an app in the Play Store! That’s complete success.

How difficult is it to make money as a developer?

So far, it hasn’t started pouring in, but I’m starting to recoup my losses, which would be really nice. I’ll let you know in a month ;)

What can Android do to improve?

Not much, honestly. I think the Developer Console is awesome, and it’s so easy to upload an app. You have to think about all the different phones that run Android, there’s thousands of them, and they’re all different sizes, with different resolutions and capabilities, and if someone with my background says it’s easy to build for Android, then you have to believe it.

Why did you choose Android? Do you develop for other platforms? What are the differences between them?

I chose Android because I’m an Android user. It’s also cheaper to develop for, and way it’s easier. I’m working on an iOS app, and so far it’s been very difficult just to sign up for a developer account and upload test versions. It’s like night and day.

What are your thoughts on iOS and Windows 8?

I haven’t developed for Windows 8, but my limited exposure to iOS so far has made me want to stay away from it. I was surprised when I learned that you need a Mac to upload the binary for an iOS app. It’s like, do you even want new developers to build things for your device?

What do you think of the Android design guidelines?

I’m glad they’re not called rules.

What are your favorite apps?

Of course, Google Maps. I’m a map nerd, and Google Maps has always been like the Holy Grail of merging technology and maps, for me. I’m really into travel apps, anything informational. I’m excited to watch the growth of HERE maps, as well. They’re doing some really cool stuff.

What has been your experience been like working with Google?

All good so far. :)

What does the future of development look like?

Hopefully I’m in there somewhere. I think more small apps, less big ones that try to do it all, are a thing of the future. I think little apps that do one thing really well are cool, and I would like to see the companies that have the resources to do big things focus more on creating infrastructure, like APIs, so us little guys can do things with them that they might not have thought to do.

What tips do you have for aspiring developers?

Make stuff, constantly. And even though it sounds corny, most things aren’t impossible. Technology can do crazy things, if you learn how to use it.

Anything else you’d like to share?

Sure. I didn’t get to say enough about how great my wife has been in this process. She gave me the time I needed to develop, and she contributed hugely with her awesome graphic design skills. I love you, Leslie!


Developer interview wrap up

We want to thank Peter for chatting with us in this week’s developer interview! If you’re a developer and this looks like something you’d like to do, check out our Meet the Devs form! We look forward to hearing from you!

Google Play Services 6.5 rolling out with new APIs

Posted by wicked December - 10 - 2014 - Wednesday Comments Off

The new version of Google Play Services will help you build better apps, or at least that’s what Google’s plan is as they release an addendum to version 6 of Google Play Services. Included in the new batch of APIs will be new entry points from apps for Google Drive, Google Maps, a new button for Google Wallet, and an invitation for app builders to use Google Fit.

App developers can now tell their apps very specific commands when uploading data to Google Drive – ideally, that would be when battery levels are optimum and when connected to a WiFi network. Apps can now be told not to upload data when these circumstances are not met to save on power and data.

Apps can now also use a “lite mode” of Google Maps, where the map will be confined to a smaller area – like a town or a specific area of a town where you want your app to focus on – but still have all the features and functionalities of the real Google Maps app.

We’ve discussed before that the Google Wallet API will be getting a new “Donate with Google” button, and that Google is also putting a bit of pressure to app developers out there to make apps utilizing the Google Fit API which was launched in October.

SOURCE: YouTube

Meet the Devs – Hafiz Waleed Hussain

Posted by wicked December - 9 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

developer interview
Welcome back to our Meet the Devs segment! In this piece we take a little time to get to know the people who really make Android what it is today and that is the app developers. In this week’s developer interview, we are talking to Hafiz Waleed Hussain.

Name: Hafiz Waleed Hussain

Developer Name: Hafiz Waleed Hussain

Country: Pakistan

Website: Official website

Social Media Profile/Page: LinkedIn

How many people on your team? 2

developer interview

Apps

Silence Shout
Lahore Guide
Who’s Calling

About your company?

I am working independent developer in my personal time.

developer interview

What level of experience do you have with coding and development?

C++ : I learn some part from University but mostly from online tutorials
Java: Online tutorials of different universities or libraries
Python: Online tutorials. I learn to increase my motivation.
C#: Online tutorials. I learn to increase my motivation.
Swift: Online tutorials. I learn to increasing my motivation.

What level of experience do you have with design?

Intermediate.

What apps have you made?

I mead many apps but for clients or different companies. You can check on LinkedIn where I mention all apps.

How do you monetize your apps?

Nothing special.

developer interview

Do you consider yourself successful?

Yes.

How difficult is it to make money as a developer?

In my country from products very difficult.

What can Android do to improve?

Now I think we achieve smart phone from Android OS. Now I feel we need to move to next level and make intelligent phones. For which we can do many things in Android.

Why did you choose Android? Do you develop for other platforms? What are the differences between them?

In start Android is affordable for me. So I start Android development. But now Android is my best friend. And yes I make some small apps for other platforms and I feel Android is more good for development like in Android we need many things to consider like in IPhone we know hardware is powerfull, Screes sizes are fixed but in Android we face challenges on daily basis.

What are your thoughts on iOS and Windows 8?

I feel every technology and OS is just like a Universe.

What do you think of the Android design guidelines?

They are ok.

developer interview

What are your favorite apps?

All my apps. :)

What does the future of development look like?

At this time I feel very complex if we do not handle it properly.

Anything else you’d like to share?

Always try to make friendship with your technology. In start it may be possible technology show you some ego but do not take tension. And try to make friendship with that. And one day when technology feel yes you are serious in friendship. That day is your greatest day in your life. After that you enjoy technology.


Developer interview wrap up

We want to thank Hafiz Waleed Hussain for chatting with us in this week’s developer interview! If you’re a developer and this looks like something you’d like to do, check out our Meet the Devs form! We look forward to hearing from you!

Android Studio IDE reaches the big version 1.0 milestone

Posted by wicked December - 9 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

Google’s new preferred and official Integrated Development Environment (IDE) has finally reached its first stable release. With Android Studio 1.0, beginning Android developers have less hurdles to overcome when starting out, while existing developers will still have all the tools they need in one convenient package. Of course, there will be some re-learning and re-training involved, but Google is trying to make that transition as painless as possible.

To some, it might be surprising to learn that Android grew up this long without an official IDE, but it does have one, though not exactly the official IDE. Eclipse, a popular Java IDE, has been the de facto Android development environment from the beginning, but it’s not exactly a breeze to set up, especially for first timers. The old way involved getting pieces here and there and making sure they work together, a daunting task for some beginners. Android Studio emphasizes on the “integrated” part of the IDE name and lumps everything you need inside a single product.

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Android Studio is based on the open source community edition of Intellij IDEA, another popular Java IDE, but of course goes beyond simple Java. Version 1.0 introduces new features that help both beginners and power users alike. For example, there is a Setup Wizard that gets the ball rolling as well as a bunch of templates that takes the drudgery out of setting up a project. Power users will probably love the powerful editor and performance analysis features, like memory usage monitor. A convenient user interface preview lets you see your apps across multiple screen sizes, languages, and Android versions. And adding support for Google Cloud services in your app is as easy as a few clicks of a button.

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Those coming from Eclipse and older versions of Android Studio will be able to easily migrate to the stable version by using the IDE’s Import Project option. Android Studio releases will take after Chrome and offer four release channels, namely, Stable, Beta, Dev, and Canary, with Canary being the most bleeding edge of them all.

SOURCE: Android Developers

Google will start automatically deducting VAT from apps sold to European countries

Posted by wicked December - 2 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

Google_Play_Store_Logo_456There’s a change that will start affecting many developers that publish their apps on Google Play in the near future, especially those that frequently sell apps to European countries. Starting January 1st, Google will begin automatically deducting VAT (Value-Added Tax) from the sale price of applications due to a change in European law as to how the tax must be collected. Currently, developers can handle paying VAT separately and not have Google skim anything (besides the 30% fee) off the top.

Depending on the country, this means that Google could end up taking up to 25% off an app’s revenue to pay for VAT. This doesn’t mean developers will be making less money, but it does mean they’ll be losing that tax up front instead of having to pay it on the back end. Depending on who you ask, that’s either a good or bad thing.

Either way, the change takes effect at the start of the new year, so if you need to adjust your pricing for this change be sure to take a trip to the Android Developer Console.

source: Google

via: Phandroid

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