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Non-Sony Android devices get access to Sony PS4 Remote Play thanks to new port

Posted by wicked September - 23 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

xda_ps4_remote_play_port

When Sony announced their new Xperia Z3 smartphones during IFA 2014, one of the new features included was PS4 Remote Play. This new feature meant owners of the new devices could use their Sony smartphones as a second screen for the their Sony PS4 gaming platform. Even better than that, users could continue to play PS4 titles remotely on their mobile device. This was some great news for gamers who had PlayStation 4 devices if they were going to invest in a new Sony smartphone. Unfortunately, a Sony spokesperson said the company had “no intent to bring remote play to any device other than Xperia” meaning a lot of PlayStation 4 owners would miss out on the feature. That may have changed now thanks to a new port developed by XDA member XperiaPlaystation who has figured out how to get it working with a much larger population of Android devices.

According to XperiaPlaystation, the ported app should work with Android devices running at least Android 4.0 or newer. Users do have to install CWM (ClockWorkMod) Recovery, then flash a ZIP file, follow a couple other steps to clean up the device, and then install the APK file. Oddly enough, owners of a Sony Xperia Z1 have an additional step related to changing their build.prop in order to get the ported app to work.

If you have a PlayStation 4 and want to give the PS4 Remote Play app a try and you are willing to do some work on your device, hit the source link below for more detailed instructions and links to the appropriate files.

source: XDA Forum

Come comment on this article: Non-Sony Android devices get access to Sony PS4 Remote Play thanks to new port

Chromecast Is Root

Posted by wicked August - 25 - 2014 - Monday Comments Off

Chromecast

Image from [psouza4] on the xda-developers forum

Chromecast is as close as you’re going to get to a perfect device – plug it in the back of your TV, and instantly you have Netflix, Hulu, Pandora, and a web browser on the largest display in your house. It’s a much simpler device than a Raspi running XBMC, and we’ve already seen a few Chromecast hacks that stream videos from a phone and rickroll everyone around you.

Now the Chromecast has been rooted, allowing anyone to change the DNS settings (Netflix and Hulu users that want to watch content not available in their country rejoice), and loading custom apps for the Chromecast.

The process of rooting the Chromecast should be fairly simple for the regular readers of Hackaday. It requires a Teensy 2 or 2++ dev board, a USB OTG cable, and a USB flash drive. Plug the Teensy into the Chromecast and wait a minute. Remove the Teensy, plug in the USB flash drive, and wait several more minutes. Success is you, and your Chromecast is now rooted.

Member of Team-Eureka [riptidewave93] has put up a demo video of rooting a new in box Chromecast in just a few minutes. You can check that out below.

Filed under: Android Hacks, home entertainment hacks

The BlueOkiris Gameduino Console

Posted by wicked August - 2 - 2014 - Saturday Comments Off

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[Dylan] created an easy to make gaming console with an Arduino Uno, a makeshift button, an analog stick, and a TFT LCD touchscreen shield. Plus, he fashioned together a simple button with some duct tape.

So far, he has made 2 games. One is the infamous Pong. The other is a ‘Guess the Number’ type experience. The whole project is run within the code, and does not access the bootloader directly like you would with 2boots or a regular Gameduino adapter.

Build instructions can be found on [Dylan]’s hackaday.io project page (linked above). Essentially, all that is needed is to gather up the supplies, then take the button and analog stick and complete a circuit, fitting the open wires into the slots at digital pin 9. Solder the wires in place and connect ground to ground, 5v to 5v, x to A4, and y to A5. Add the TFT shield, insert a micro SD card, and upload a game.

To see it in action, check out the video after the break:

And there you go! An Arduino game console.

Other projects similar to this include a credit card-sized Gameboy and UnoJoy, which makes your Arduino play well with an Xbox 360 or PS3.

Filed under: Android Hacks

LG G Watch gets toolkit for rooting, unlocking, flashing and restoring capabilities

Posted by wicked July - 27 - 2014 - Sunday Comments Off

LG_G_Watch_Main_Screen_On_TA

The Nexus Root Toolkit from Wugfresh has become insanely popular since the interest in unlocking bootloaders and rooting devices has expanded to “normal” consumers.

Now, those with an LG G Watch will be able to root and unlock the device just as easily as Wugfresh’s Nexus solution provides.

Created by XDA developer Tomsgt, the LG G Watch Tool prepares your watch for aftermarket development and modification. You’ll be able to do the following with the toolkit:

  • Unlock/relock the bootloader
  • Flashing stock recovery
  • Flashing stock boot image
  • Restoring the device if bricked
  • Rooting the G Watch
  • Installing and testing necessary drivers

The XDA Developers forum says you can run the toolkit on Windows, Linux and iOS (although we’re pretty sure they meant OS X).

You can check out the tutorial video below provided by Tomsgt if you’re trying this out for the first time. Since he also included a restore feature in the toolkit, it would pretty tough to brick your device beyond repair — especially since most of these processes are nearly 100% automated by a script.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Source: XDA Developers

 

Come comment on this article: LG G Watch gets toolkit for rooting, unlocking, flashing and restoring capabilities

Self-Balancing Robot Uses Android and Lego NXT

Posted by wicked July - 17 - 2014 - Thursday Comments Off

LEGO NXT + Android = Self Balancing Robot

Self-balancing robots are pretty cool, but sometimes a bit too complex to make. [HippoDevices] shows us that it’s really not that hard, and you can even do it with Lego NXT and an Android device!

First step is to build your two-wheeled robot – go nuts! As long as the Lego NXT motors are strong enough you’ll be able to make most different shaped robots easy to balance. You’re going to need an Android ADK board to provide communication between the Lego motors and your Android device. [HippoDevices] is using their own design, called the Hippo-ADK which is on Kickstarter currently.

This allows your Android device to read the status and control the Lego Motors — from there it’s just a matter of programming it to balance according to the device’s gyroscope.

And since you already have a smart device on your robot, you can control it with another Android device!

[Thanks Zipper!]

Filed under: Android Hacks, robots hacks, toy hacks

The Future Of Distraction, Right In Front Of Your Face

Posted by wicked July - 9 - 2014 - Wednesday Comments Off

Bird

Say you’re meeting someone new, and instead of communicating like a normal person that wasn’t born in a barn, they play with their phone the entire time. How about a cashier or sales person who is so insufferably distracted with the Facebooks you’d guess they had a side job in the QA department of some developer? All these things will soon be a distant, horrible memory, because now you can play Flappy Bird on Google Glass.

[Rich] has had his Glass for a while now, and has been meaning to write an app for it. It took a little bit of inspiration, but when the idea of using the eye sensor to control everyone’s favorite 8-bit bird, everything fell into place. It ended up being an interesting use for the Glass, and something we actually wouldn’t mind trying out.

The bird is controlled by a double blink. In the video below, you can see there might be a little bit of latency depending on how [Rich] put the video together. Better grab that .APK while there’s still time. [Rich] says it’s a free download for anyone who’s already overpaid for a Google Glass.

Filed under: Android Hacks, google hacks

Android L Preview now has root

Posted by wicked June - 27 - 2014 - Friday Comments Off

Android_Developer_L_Preview_Nexus_5_Nexus_7

If you own a Nexus 5 or a Nexus 7 (2013 WiFi), then you might have already taken the plunge and flashed the Android L Preview factory images. If you have, you might be happy to know that root has been achieved thanks to XDA developer savoca.

It doesn’t appear to be all that hard. Let’s put it this way….If you can flash the factory images, then you can probably root your device with this method. You will need a custom recovery installed, then flash Chainfire’s SuperSU. Finally, fastboot flash the appropriate boot.img. Not all that hard is it?

One thing to note is that root access with the L Preview is a little different regarding system write access, most likely due to the report from Chainfire. So you will find that certain apps can write to /system, while others cannot.

source: XDA

Come comment on this article: Android L Preview now has root

The Bluetooth iPod Controller For Android

Posted by wicked June - 16 - 2014 - Monday Comments Off

iDuinoid

By now, just about everyone in the industrialized world has a broken iPod with a cracked screen, a battery that won’t charge, or one that’s simply sitting in a drawer somewhere. The iPod is still a great way to store music, though, and [Trevor] came up with a way to control its playback with an Android device, showing the song name, playlists, and everything else with an Arduino and a cheap Bluetooth adapter

With the right resistance on a specific pin on the 30-pin dock connector, iPods will send the track name, and playlists over a serial connection, as well as respond to play, pause, skip, and volume commands. There hasn’t been much work towards implementing the copious amount of documentation of this iPod accessory mode in small microcontroller projects, but with a little bit of work, [Trevor] managed to replicate the usual iPod dock commands with an Arduino.

Using an HC-05 Bluetooth module, it’s possible to get this iPod-connected Arduino to relay data to and from an Android device with a small app. The circuit is simple, the app is free, and if you have an iPod with an old battery or cracked screen, it can still work as a music storage device. Not bad, [Trevor].

Filed under: Android Hacks, ipod hacks

A Head Unit Docking Station

Posted by wicked June - 10 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

dock

[Ivan] had a simple idea: being able to control his Android device from the small keypad on his car’s steering column. This would allow him to cycle through apps, navigation, and audio tracks while never taking his hands off the wheel. Feature creep then set in and [Ivan] asked himself how he could charge his phone through the same interface. What he ended up with is a head unit that’s also a dock.

While [Ivan]‘s steering wheel doesn’t have the nice integrated remote control buttons found in newer cars, he does have a Blaupunkt remote, a small, clip-on controller that has a an IR transmitter on it. The IR receiver was connected to a PIC microcontroller, sending commands to the phone for up, down, left, right, menu, and home. Audio output from the phone is handled by a small USB sound card connected to a USB hub, sending the audio signals directly into the head unit’s amplifier.

Having the phone charge while it’s still in USB host mode is the crucial part of this build; not being able to charge on a long car ride would quickly drain the battery and make a car dock kind of pointless. To accomplish this, [Ivan] simulated a Galaxy S4 dock with a few resistors in the USB port, allowing the phone to control the USB sound card, listen to the emulated keyboard and mouse, and charge at the same time.

It’s not a pretty build, but it is extraordinarily useful. In the videos you can see that [Ivan] pretty much pulled this build together from stuff he had sitting around – a great reuse of junk, and a great addition to his car at the same time.

Filed under: Android Hacks, transportation hacks

E-reader Becomes Sailplane And Paraglider Computer

Posted by wicked May - 29 - 2014 - Thursday Comments Off

sail [Tweepy] flies unpowered aircraft, and he’d like to use the XCSoar flight computer app for gliders, sailplanes, and paragliders, but couldn’t find any hardware. XCSoar is an amazing app that can keep track of terrain, route, thermals, and a whole bunch of other variables that make flying more enjoyable, but running it on a device useful for a hang glider pilot is a challenge.

He eventually found a nearly perfect device in the Kobo mini e-reader. It’s e-ink, so it’s sunlight readable, uses a glove-compatible resistive touchscreen, runs Android, and is dirt cheap. The only thing lacking was a GPS receiver. What was [Tweepy] to do? Mod an e-reader, of course.

The electronic portion of the mod was simple enough; serial GPS units can be found just about everywhere, and the Kobo has a serial headers on the board. The case, however, required a bit of thingiverseing, and the completed case mod looks fairly professional.

With a few software updates, new maps, and of course the phenomenal XCSoar app, [Tweepy] had an awesome flight computer for under 100 Euro. The only thing missing is an integrated variometer, but a Game Boy will work in a pinch.

Filed under: Android Hacks