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Cops take matters into their own hands with Waze fake police reports

Posted by wicked February - 14 - 2015 - Saturday Comments Off

You don’t listen to our complaints and requests to take down that feature? Fine, we’ll do it our own way. At least, that’s what we think what the cops are saying to Google and Waze since they were basically ignored. We reported a few weeks ago about the issues cops are having with the police feature in the navigation app, and this time, they are taking matters into their own hands, so to speak.

Several prominent police officials requested that Google take down that feature in Waze where users can share cop sightings in the areas, saying that this can actually be used by some people for nefarious and dangerous purposes. Even though most people use them to actually avoid cops, they believe that it poses a danger to some cops’ well-being, especially given tense relations lately between the public and law enforcement in some states.

NBC Miami has reported that some cops in the region have taken to the digital streets by downloading Waze and then flooding it with fake reports of police sightings. This is both in unofficial protest against Google and also to confuse users and throw off the scent on actual sightings. There is nothing in the user agreement that requires people (or agencies) to make legit reports, which is also one of the drawbacks of a crowd-sourced navigation app like Waze.

There is no official statement yet from any law enforcement agency if this is an actual campaign. There is also no word from Google regarding the latest development in their “tiff” with the cops. Let’s wait for the next chapter in this ongoing digital argument.

VIA: SlashGear

Is Google Lost? A Reflection On Android Navigation

Posted by wicked January - 13 - 2015 - Tuesday Comments Off

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I remember my first Android device, and how it differed to the ones I have now in one major point: navigation keys. My old Motorola XT316 (a mid-range phone for Latin American markets) came with Froyo 2.2 and featured 4 TFT capacitive navigation keys: menu, home, back, and the long gone “search”. Android phones have come a long way since that OS, and since the early days of archaic UI design and choppy performance. Now we have the most beautiful and smoothest Android, and arguably one of the best Operating Systems… But there’s something that I really think has not improved all that much despite all the optimizations, and that is navigation.

By navigation, I mean the tools and means you’ve got that encompass all of your options for moving around your interface, or interacting with it. The most notable part of Android’s navigation would be, without a doubt, the navigation keys. Other aspects include the notification bar and shade, and the recent applications panel. While one could argue that the enhancements to speed and smoothness are the most significant improvements one could make to navigation, there are some other functions, additions and usability tweaks that also grant you a better sailing through your vast OS. There’s more to good navigation than just the bare basics and simplicity of the button offerings of Android.

While the 3 bottom keys are intuitive enough, I think Google really should have stretched a little more towards fundamentally improving the Android experience in its latest OS. I personally think that Material Design, and consequently Lollipop, feels more of a skinpack than it is a new iteration of Android, or the revolution in usability that some fans wanted it to be. I guess that when an OS gets to a certain point, there’s not that much to improve other than tweak the user experience through the aesthetics and direct interactions with the UI… but if this is the case, why was navigation neglected, given that there are many good navigation alternatives or concepts out there that could be incorporated? Let’s explore how Google could have done more for a better navigation in Android.

 

Software keys, Functions

 

The 3-key setup in Android is beautifully efficient. It works, and I think few people would have complaints with it. Like previously mentioned, my first device had 4 keys, and some were known to have 5. The removal of the Search button first, and the Menu button later meant a simpler, more efficient Android user interaction. The functions aren’t gone, but now have to be incorporated into the apps that feature them – because this was the problem all along; some apps didn’t need a Menu button, and even more apps didn’t need a Search button. This was a great fat trim by Google.

The movement from capacitive buttons to on-screen buttons allows for a lot of versatility that hasn’t been fully exploited: the keys are no longer tied to a graphic or icon, and thus their function isn’t predetermined to the user. In theory, having on-screen keys means that the keys can take many shapes and do many things, dynamically adapting to the context of the screen. You don’t see much of this on Android. The back key turns into a “Down” key when your keyboard is up, but that’s about it. I’d love to see more things like this, but with more creative context-sensitive functions.

The problem with this is the fact that there are just 3 keys. While you could have some nicer functions appear when the context is right, that would mean some other keys would have to go for the time the new option is available – and we don’t want that. After all, it’d be terrible to not be able to go home or switch apps when a certain element is on the screen. Regardless, I think something else can be done to maximize the possibility of on-screen buttons. Which leads me my second point about the bottom keys: Customizability.

The LG G3 had something that almost every reviewer loved about it, even if some didn’t use the feature: you could customize the navigation keys! Something so simple had taken almost 3 years (since the first software keys on the Galaxy Nexus) to be incorporated by any official phone maker. On LG’s flagship, you could set how many keys you wanted at the bottom, and what keys you wanted there, including access to useful features like multi-window, the deceased menu key, and something we didn’t even know we wanted in the form of a key to bring down the notification panel. Now, the best part about this is that the phone has a large display – and most phones are going this way – so it has the room to accommodate for more buttons without sacrificing much. We’ll talk a little more about phablets in a bit.

nexus2cee_ImportantGenerousAdeliepenguin_thumbAs another note, there’s still a lot of functionality ground Google hasn’t explored with their softkey offering. For example, ROMs like Cyanogen, Omni, Carbon, and Paranoid Android have had the “quick-switch” on the recents key for a while, allowing you to long-press the recents key to quickly access the app you opened before the current one. A little thing like that can do wonders for navigation and can really trim a second or two out of the transition. Things like sliding up software keys have also been known to be incorporated in ROMs. And much more could be thought of and added if Google employees sat in front of the drawing board (with a nice paycheck incentive, of course!) to come up with the future of Android navigation. Things like letting us link a few keys or functions to a single key slot, then swiping the software keys up to swap between them for when we need them, maybe having a nice little menu pop up for visual aid as to what key we are selecting. Not the best idea, but it took me a few seconds of unpaid thinking to come up with… I’m sure a software designer could do much more.

 

Recents panel, Animations

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3 - 6BCLnzHThe new recents panel is beautiful. Simply beautiful! The Lollipop dev preview had me in awe at the sight of such a pretty, colorful and smooth stack of cards for me to file through. But now that I’ve been using Lollipop on multiple devices for a few months, it doesn’t feel all that special, and the initial magic is gone. The old panel, albeit uglier, worked a little better. I find myself spending more time scrolling through the cards back and forth than I did with my older panels. SlimKat and Paranoid Android, for example, also had very efficient recents panel alternatives, that worked well and fast. And I had added in a rather unconventional one for my Note 3’s ROM (pictured) that worked surprisingly well for a phablet.

The motions of the card-stack aren’t confusing enough to warrant a redesign, and admittedly I don’t have a big gripe with the new system, as looking at it is pleasing. But what I think of it when I see it is something that I feel Google is increasingly adopting: style over function. The long animations of Lollipop are pretty, but like hundreds have already pointed out before, they are just way too drawn out. I keep my animations either disabled or set to .5 speed, as I’m sure many here do. Without faster animations, I feel like I’m waiting for my processor-powerhouses of phones to do things I know it can do in a pinch. This also detracts from navigation, as the point of efficient navigation is to save time, not look cool.

 

Interface, Phablets

 

Another big point of navigation is the cardinal location of objects in the interface. I think that Google has a weird double-think on this front. On one side, they are pushing bigger screens to our pockets with their affinity for phablets, given that they opted for a 6 inch device with their latest flagship, often coined their “vision of Android”. At the same time, Google has been doing very little (read, nothing) to incorporate phablet features into Android. And most importantly, phablet navigation. If anything, I feel like they are doing the opposite with their apps.

The bane of a (right-handed) phablet user’s user experience is objects located to the upper left corner of the screen. Which is, coincidentally, where Google’s guidelines place the action bar, the heart of modern apps. If it wasn’t for the Note’s one-handed mode (which shrinks the entire screen), I’d be forced to risk my phone’s integrity by doing hand gymnastics worthy of the power-user olympics Gold Medal. That is just not cool.

Then there’s the fact that, like previously mentioned, phablets can efficiently house more than just 3 software keys, like the G3 proved. But another big issue for navigation on phablets is the fact that the bottom edge of a phablet also requires some hand gymnastics, particularly the bottom left corner. All of this detracts from navigation, as you have to re-adjust your hand to reach certain aspects of the screen. Even Apple had the foresight to incorporate a feature to make one-handed reachability easier on their phablet.

There’s many solutions to this problem. The easiest would be hiding the navigation keys, like their immersive mode already allows for, and adding PIE controls. Many ROMs have incorporated PIE controls already, and there’s Playstore alternatives out there too. The problem with the latter is that they aren’t officially supported, they can be pushed out of RAM and some functions like Menu and Back require root. That already makes it not as good as a built-in solution, which Google has already patented, but never applied!

And finally, there’s some additional features that greatly enhance phablet navigation, such as keyboards that adjust to the side of the screen (like featured on LG and Samsung phablets), or Samsung’s previously mentioned one-handed mode, which comes handy more often than you’d think. But the other very overlooked Samsung feature that just makes handling navigation so much more organic is their multi-window. If there is a reason to have a phablet, multi-window would be it. Some bits of multi-window code were found in AOSP code, and everyone expected Lollipop and its host phablet to bring it, but it didn’t. And Samsung’s solution in particular has fundamentally changed the way I see apps on my phone. If I am watching a YouTube video, and I want to navigate to the chat I had opened previously, rather than switching apps and missing out on the video or audio by pausing it, I can just swiftly resize it and leave it playing on a corner as I type my message. I never thought it would be as useful as it is, but I use it literally all the time and it brings the mobile OS closer to a fully fledged desktop replacement. It’s something you’ve got to try and get used to in order to fully appreciate, and I can’t imagine daily driving a phone without it now.

Finally, having the 480 DPI standard on a phablet is a little ridiculous, specially when Google insists on the Nexus 6’s default launcher to have 4×4 grids of immense icons. It looks like a stretched out phone, and with more room for more content you can also have a better effective navigation, as more options are available to you at any given time without necessarily sacrificing much intuitiveness or ease of use and reach.

 

Where are you going, Google?

 

So here I am wondering why Google’s software designers haven’t addressed some of these issues, added some of these features, and adapted their software to their new vision. There are hundreds of multi-tasking solutions I haven’t talked about, many of them on the Playstore or on XDA ROMs. Switchr, for example, works great and I used it for a while. There are also ways to access apps without visual aid, such as gestures. Why can’t Google look at their developer community and draw inspiration from them? Why can’t they act on their own patents? And why don’t they try to push navigation forward, in a time where we want our experience to be more efficient and pleasant? I love Lollipop, to the point where I can’t go back to my old KitKat ROMs and all the Xposed goodness. But in my sweet love for Lollipop’s optimizations and new features lay some grips and annoyances with its setbacks and conformities. Let’s hope the next version makes the OS as fluid and organic as it can be.

The post Is Google Lost? A Reflection On Android Navigation appeared first on xda-developers.

Garmin unveils Vivoactive, Vivofit 2, and Epix navigation device

Posted by wicked January - 6 - 2015 - Tuesday Comments Off

Garmin International is launching new fitness products and a hands-free navigation device at the CES in Las Vegas: the Vivoactive smartwatch, Vivofit 2, Style Collection, and the Epix. The first three models are ideal for those health buffs and fitness enthusiasts and the last one is a first-of-its-kind hands-free navigation device. As a leader in GPS technology, Garmin continues to bring in new products with great features and functionality.

The vívoactive is a new GPS smartwatch that tracks more of the users physical activities from running to cycling, swimming and golfing through the available tracking apps. The smart watch offers smart notifications of incoming text messages, emails, or calls from a compatible smartphone.

What’s good about this particular smartwatch is the hi-res sunlight readable touchscreen display. It also comes with interchangeable bands to match any outfit. Even when out of range from the smartphone, the Vivoactive can still track stats with the use of the GPS-enabled sports apps. If you want to track more health data, you can choose to pair the device with a bike speed sensor or a heart rate monitor. Available $249.99 and $299.99 (heart rate monitor bundle).

Garmin has also introduced the Connect IQ Store where you can get free widgets, face design, and more apps for customization and fitness tracking such as the Auto Lap, Auto Pause, and different vibration alerts for run and walk intervals, pace, and heart rate. There’s also the golf app that features more than 38,000 golf courses.

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The Vivofit 2 is an obvious follow up to the Vivofit. This new model now features a visual move bar on the display, audible alerts, activity timer for tracking and analyzing workout. It also features a new backlight for easier viewing even in the dark. This one also comes with interchangeable design options.

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The Style Collection is ideal for the more stylish and fashionable fitness buffs. It features different band options for the Vivofit 2. You can choose any band available in different colors from the Style Collection’s Signature Series line. There are various fashionable designs available for both men and women and made from premium materials like stainless steel and leather.

The Vivofit 2 will be out in white, black, pink, and navy this Q1. As for the price, the Vivofit is said to be worth $129.99 or $169.99 with the black or white heart rate monitor bundle. The accessary bands under the Style Collection series will be available in active (blue, red, green), energy (canary, pink, violet), serenity (mint,cloud, lilac), downtown (burgundy, slate, navy), and neutral (black, slate, white).

Garmin epix

Garmin also announced the Epix, a new navi device that acts as a GPS mapping watch. It’s a first of its kind according to the company. It comes equipped with a 1.4-inch hi-res color touchscreen display, 8GB built-in memory, omni0directional EXO steel antenna, GPS, GLONASS support, and traditional compass/barometer/altimeter features. This one also worls with ANT+ sensors so you can monitor heart rate and temperature.

It’s not a smartwatch, just a mapping watch for active outdoor people. It’s simply a hands-free navigator that allows a more efficient and accurate navigation and outdoor features. It doesn’t only track health and fitness data but it also allows the user to plan future physical activities and routes. It also has access to the Connect IQ store for customization. It can last up to 24 hours in watch mode. When it UltraTac mode, its battery life is 50 hours and as long as four months in watch mode. It can also withstand being underwater up to 50 meters. This one is a great product but it’s a bit pricey at $549.99.

SOURCE: Garmin 1,2,3

Video: Android Auto in full detail

Posted by wicked November - 24 - 2014 - Monday Comments Off

By now, you’re familiar with Android Auto. The blossoming in-car platform is Google’s attempt at diversifying their platform everywhere you are, and driving is no different. As we increasingly use our phones for things like navigation, they become more like an in-car device. Motorola has even created profiles for when you’re driving with one of their devices, effectively making a tiny in-car system of their own. At the recent LA Auto Show, Chris Davies from our sister site SlashGear got to spend some time with Android Auto. Check it out!


The point of Android Auto is to stop us from actually handling our phone during those times we should be, you know, paying attention to the road ahead (and/or behind). By taking the experience into your car’s dash, your phone is still providing the info necessary, but you don’t have to fumble with your handheld device.

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Android Auto also doesn’t take over your car’s experience as you might find it — it’s totally complimentary to it. If your car’s OEM has built in some features of their own, Android Auto is simply an add-on to that, relying on tech you might use on your phone.

The video below is a touch long at 15 minutes or so, but provides the first in-depth look at Android Auto we’ve really seen. If you’re excited to see what Android Auto will be like in your next new car, check out the video below.

HERE navigation app updated for Android Lollipop

Posted by wicked November - 8 - 2014 - Saturday Comments Off

There will be an avalanche of apps hurrying to update their codes to play nice with Android 5.0, one of those is Nokia’s HERE maps and turn-by-turn navigation app. The app was once locked down to the Windows Phone OS, but Nokia chose to release it in beta for Android recently. Now it’s getting updated for Lollipop.

There was a bug that caused the app to stop when using early versions of Android 5.0, so the developers made sure that the app now works on the Material Design environment of Lollipop. The developers are also pushing for feedback from users on how the app runs with the newly released Android OS version.

The updated beta version app also brings several improvements with it, including the capability to report bugs and offer suggestions from within the app. The update also fixes the bug where downloaded non-English voices would disappear if users have a “cache cleaner” app installed. But the fix means that people will have to re-download any non-English voices they use on the app.

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Do you use the HERE app? Tell us about your experience on it. The developer team has voiced its appreciation for over 1 million downloads of the beta app. If you want to download the latest update that works with lollipop, head on over to the source link for instructions.

VIA: Here 360

Navdy HUD projects virtual images onto car’s windshield

Posted by wicked August - 11 - 2014 - Monday Comments Off

Several sci-fi movies from the past (and recent) years have scenes showing holograms being projected on a car’s dashboard or windshield. But with the advances in technology, sooner or later, that kind of device would not be fiction anymore, but a common reality for consumers. Navdy’s aftermarket HUD is bringing it one step closer, as the device acts as a Google Glass for your car.

Aside from just using it as a navigation system through Google Maps, the device can also be used as a secondary screen for your smartphone, as it can project several functions at least six feet in front of your windshield. Through the use of gesture controls, you can show calls and messages into your line of sight so that you don’t need to look at your phone every time a message or call comes in. If you want to answer the call, you just need to wave your hand to the left or if you’re avoiding (hiding from) a call, just wave it to the other direction.

As for reading and sending messages and making calls, you will be able to use Google’s voice recognition system to do those functions. You can even use it to post something on Twitter while you’re driving (and maybe not be pulled over by the police for tweeting while driving).

navdy_front_directions

Navdy can also be used for Google Now and most of the major music apps, which might eventually make the need for a tape or CD deck in your car obsolete. Your other notifications can also be projected but not all of them can be actionable. There’s also a split-screen option so you can see both your notifications and your navigation details.

The device, which runs on Android 4.4, has a 5.1-inch transparent HUD display and has WiFi and Bluetooth for connectivity. For the touchless controls, it uses an IR camera and in terms of navigating, it includes an accelerometer, digital compass and ambient light sensor. It can also warn you when your oil needs replacing and when your car needs to be serviced next. You can pre-order it now at $299 although by the time it hits retail stores in 2015, it will cost you $499. But if you really want a cool device in your car and you could afford it, then you wouldn’t mind shelling out that much for sure.

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VIA: SlashGear

Google Maps 8.2 features voice action, biking elevation

Posted by wicked July - 18 - 2014 - Friday Comments Off

It was at the end of May this year when we saw that last significant update of Google Maps, bringing back Terrain View to the app – but today we’re seeing a bunch of new stuff being rolled out by the mothership to its primary maps software. Version 8.2 of Google Maps carries some nifty updates that should make outdoor ad biking enthusiasts happy, as well as some voice actions added into the app while in navigation.

The APK is available at the source link (bottom of the post) if you want to go ahead and install the new version. Don’t worry, the MD5 hash is digitally signed by Google and the APK will just update the Google Maps software in your device. The official rollout will most likely take days to get to you, so if you don’t want to endure the wait, go ahead and grab the APK.

The new elevation feature is pretty nice for bikers, especially if you’re the type (like me) who will want to avoid the higher elevations. If you’re a biking monster and eat up elevation like chocolate chip cookies, the feature will also be nice for you. You will basically see the elevation in a timeline view of your route, and even get comparisons of multiple routes. Nice, right?

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The voice actions is initiated by that familiar icon, and you can ask familiar questions like “how far to my destination?” and stuff like that. It also understands “what’s my next turn?”, very useful when driving in traffic and unfamiliar areas. So give it a whirl, you might enjoy Google Maps 8.2.

VIA: Android Police

VIDEO: First look at Android Auto (Android in the car) at Google I/O 2014

Posted by wicked June - 25 - 2014 - Wednesday Comments Off

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Android for your car has been a long-rumored concept, and now it’s finally here in all its glory at Google I/O.

Dubbed Android Auto, it isn’t a fully embedded OS for your car, but a connection between your car’s interface and your device. Each system is personalized just for you, because all you have to do is plug in and go. For more information about the platform, click here.

Be sure to check out the rest of our Google I/O 2014 coverage as well.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Come comment on this article: VIDEO: First look at Android Auto (Android in the car) at Google I/O 2014

Garmin launches new premium navigation app called víago

Posted by wicked June - 17 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

Garmin_viago_Large_Icon

Garmin finally decided that its $30 StreetPilot app might be a little overpriced, and has just released a new app called víago. With víago, pricing starts at $1.99 ($.99 until July 13), but you can also add additional features through in-app purchases.

Let’s start with what you get for $1.99. You will get off-board maps for many regions around the world along with lane assist, weather information, in-map traffic display, photo-realistic junction views, and the current speed (with speed limits). Premium add-ons include downloadable maps (“Maps to Go”) for when you don’t have a data connection, real-time traffic, urban navigation with public transportation, 3D terrain view, and more. In app purchases range from $4.99 to $19.99.

There’s one problem and that most of these features are available elsewhere at no cost. Not only that, it appears you can easily spend upwards of the old price of $30 for Street Pilot with these extras. I should also note that the public transportation feature is only on iOS for now, but will come to Android soon. Also, map data is updated 4 times per year.

Still, Garmin is one of the pioneers in navigation, and lot of people are comfortable with them. If that is you, we have download links below, as well as screenshots and a video.

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Click here to view the embedded video.

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Play Store Download Link

Garmin® Launches víago™, A Feature-Packed Navigation App Starting at $1.99

App Includes Leading Garmin Navigation, In App Purchases Offer Additional Premium Features

OLATHE, Kan./June 17, 2014/Business Wire — Garmin® International Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), the global leader in satellite navigation, today announced víago, a new premium navigation app for Android™ and iPhone® starting at $1.99. Garmin víago offers advanced navigation features not available from free apps, guiding drivers through the most challenging situations with ease. The app comes with off-board maps for many regions around the world and navigation features such as current speed and speed limit display, lane assist, weather information, in-map traffic display, and photo-realistic junction views. Plus, users can easily upgrade their experience with premium add-ons like downloadable maps (“Maps to Go”) that don’t require a data connection to navigate, real-time traffic with automatic rerouting, urban navigation with public transportation1, 3D terrain view, and much more. Víago is the first smartphone navigation app that features Garmin Real DirectionsTM (in app purchase), giving spoken turn-by-turn directions just like a friend would by using recognizable landmarks, buildings, stop signs and traffic lights.

“Garmin víago offers the best navigation technology available from Garmin, helping drivers to reduce stress and save time on the road,” said Joern Watzke, vice president world-wide mobile business at Garmin Wuerzburg GmbH. ”The comprehensive feature set goes far beyond simple turn-by-turn directions and assists drivers like no other navigation app. Premium in app purchase options allow users to fully customize their navigation experience and only choose the features they want.“

Leading Navigation from Garmin

Garmin víago is the perfect starting point for any journey with accurate turn-by-turn directions, high-quality off-board maps from HERE, and premium features. The intuitive and clean interface keeps the map at the center of the user experience at all times. Planning trips is easy with the convenient multi-stop route planner that lets users add multiple destinations to a trip. The app even provides information on the weather conditions at the destination, including a 3-day forecast. Additional features of the app include lane assist and photo-realistic junction views, letting drivers know in advance which lane they should be in to make a turn. Speed Limit Display provides information on speed limits, conveniently displayed next to current speed.

Víago also is a perfect companion in urban or metropolitan areas with pedestrian navigation and information on public transportation1. Users can easily switch from one mode to another, for example from car to pedestrian navigation to continue by foot after parking the car.

Upgrade with Premium Features

Garmin víago offers a whole array of additional premium features through in app purchase packages. Users can purchase high-quality onboard maps (Maps to Go)2 that are stored locally on the smartphone, providing navigation capabilities even in areas where cell phone coverage is spotty, such as when traveling in the backcountry. Maps to Go are available for different regions around the world to avoid roaming fees when navigating abroad. The maps can conveniently be purchased within the víago app and there’s no need to download separate apps. Other premium in app purchases include Garmin Real DirectionsTM, a feature only available from Garmin that gives more natural and intuitive directions, using landmarks, stop signs and traffic lights, rather than hard-to-read street names. The Safety Kit package includes, among other features, Active Lane Guidance, displaying an animated graphic next to the map view that uses brightly colored arrows to indicate the proper lane needed to make a turn. With Traffic Live users automatically get routed around gridlock, utilizing historic and real-time data from other drivers. Panorama View offers 3D views obtained from NASA’s height and terrain data for intuitive visual orientation. Urban Guidance1 integrates public transportation, complete with detailed itineraries of transit stops. To learn more about the in app purchase packages, go to garmin.com/viago.

Useful Accessories

Garmin víago is compatible with Garmin HUD, an innovative new way of viewing navigation information in the car. HUD projects crisp and bright directions onto a transparent film on the windshield or an attached reflector lens. By providing comprehensive road guidance at a glance and right within the driver’s line of sight, HUD can help increase safety and reduce driver distraction. Garmin also offers a variety of mounts to safely secure the smartphone in the car while navigating.

Pricing and Availability

Garmin víago is available now on Google PlayTM and the App Store at an introductory price of $.99 (normally $1.99) until July 13, 2014. The in app purchase packages range from $4.99 to $19.99. Maps to Go and Traffic Live are 50 percent off during the promotional period.

Garmin víago is the latest from the consumer automotive segment at Garmin, the leading provider of mobile navigation solutions for automobiles, motorcycles and trucks. The user-friendly personal navigation devices and apps from Garmin have innovative features that provide time- and fuel-saving benefits to meet the demands of everyday driving.

About Garmin International Inc.

Garmin International Inc. is a subsidiary of Garmin Ltd. (Nasdaq: GRMN), the global leader in satellite navigation. Since 1989, this group of companies has designed, manufactured, marketed and sold navigation, communication and information devices and applications – most of which are enabled by GPS technology. Garmin’s products serve automotive, mobile, wireless, outdoor recreation, marine, aviation, and OEM applications. A component of the S&P 500 index, Garmin Ltd. is incorporated in Switzerland, and its principal subsidiaries are located in the United States, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit Garmin’s virtual pressroom at www.garmin.com/pressroom or contact the Media Relations department at 913-397-8200.

Garmin is a registered trademark of Garmin Ltd. Apple and iPhone are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc. All other brands, product names, company names, trademarks and service marks are the properties of their respective owners. All rights reserved.

Notice on Forward-Looking Statements:

This release includes forward-looking statements regarding Garmin Ltd. and its business. Such statements are based on management’s current expectations.  The forward-looking events and circumstances discussed in this release may not occur and actual results could differ materially as a result of known and unknown risk factors and uncertainties affecting Garmin, including, but not limited to, the risk factors listed in the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 28, 2013, filed by Garmin with the Securities and Exchange Commission (Commission file number 0-31983).  A copy of such Form 10-K is available at http://www.garmin.com/aboutGarmin/invRelations/finReports.html.  No forward-looking statement can be guaranteed. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made and Garmin undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise.

1 Only available for iPhone at launch, Android will follow shortly after.

2 Map updates are provided up to four times a year, depending on the region.

Come comment on this article: Garmin launches new premium navigation app called víago

Garmin Viago navigation app lands in the Play Store

Posted by wicked June - 17 - 2014 - Tuesday Comments Off

Android users now have another option to consider when it comes to navigation. This latest app is called Viago and from a company that will be familiar to many — Garmin. The Garmin Viago app is available from today, priced from $0.99 and touted as being one that allows you to “navigate with features you won’t find in free apps.”

Some of the highlight features include turn-by-turn navigation and lane assist. The Viago app also offers something called photoReal junction views which provide a “realistic look at interchanges ahead.” The Viago app also shows information to include the current street, as well as your current speed and the speed limit.

The maps are searchable by address and point-of-interest, and the maps are online. In other words, you’ll need to make sure you are connected to get the most out of the Viago app. On the flip side, having the maps online means you are using less on-device storage, and that you should always have up to date maps.

Aside from Viago being a $0.99 purchase — there are in-app purchases available. Garmin lists this as allowing the user to customize their experience with optional upgrades. One of those upgrades will put the maps on your device — for times when you are not sure you will have a proper internet connection.

Having said all that, more options for navigation sounds good, however in the case of Garmin Viago — many of the reviews seem to suggest the in-app purchases are not all that inexpensive. The Garmin Viago app is priced at $0.99 and available from the Google Play Store.

VIA: Engadget

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